Posted tagged ‘Health and Welfare’

DBRG Health Symposium 22nd October 2017 – Surrey

June 24, 2017

Two of our favourite veterinary specialists are speaking at the DBRG Symposium to be held in Surrey on 22nd October 2017.

Dr Clare Rusbridge has worked closely with us on Lafora Disease and Professor Sheila Crispin has supported our research into Distichiasis in Mini Long Dachshunds.

Date of Event
22nd October 2017
Description
When bad becomes normal – Welfare problems related to conformation

With an emphasis on neurological problems such as Chiari-like malformation, brachycephaly, syringomyelia, vertebral malformations in screw tailed breeds, and Wobbler’s syndrome, Clare discusses how selection for certain conformation may increase risk of disease and opens discussion on how they could be addressed.

 

Ocular problems related to poor head conformation: the wrong kind o f skin and excessive amounts of skin

With the exception of known inherited diseases such as hereditary cutaneous hyaluronosis (HCH), the reasons for poor head conformation are complex and do not follow patterns of Mendelian inheritance.  Sheila will argue that breed-specific standards are fine, provided that those standards are not causing, or perpetuating, conformational abnormalities that have health and welfare implications.

 

Ocular problems related to poor head conformation: skull shape, does it matter?

What happens when we select for characteristics that change the shape of the dog’s skull? There are more than 400 documented breeds worldwide and their craniofacial morphological diversity is astounding, but not necessarily synonymous with good health. Sheila discusses the adverse impact that skull shape can have on a dog’s quality of life, with particular emphasis on the ocular problems associated with brachycephaly.

 

When bad becomes normal:  Inherited disease

With an emphasis on neurological problems such as Lafora’s disease, degenerative myelopathy, epilepsy, and inherited susceptibility to immune-mediated disease and cancer, Clare Rusbridge discusses how challenging it can be to avoid genetic disease or disease susceptibility and opens discussion on how to tackle inherited disorders in a breed.

DBRG Symposium 2017

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“Little Legs” fundraising to support IVDD Screening

June 6, 2017

A message from Carley Denton and Lisa Roylance:

Little Legs IVDDLittle Legs Fundraising has been born from a passion for the health and welfare of our beloved breed.

Why?
There are some amazing initiatives ongoing for dogs who are suffering from IVDD and because this can be as many as 1 in 4, we are trying to tackle the root cause.

Objective:
The hope is that we can raise £15,000 so breeders can undertake screening at a reduced cost and make informed decisions about their breeding programmes to reduce the number of IVDD cases causing devastation on a daily basis. Prevention is always better than cure and we would wholeheartedly appreciate any support.

How can you help?
Donate, even a small amount at: https://www.gofundme.com/little-legs-fundraising-for-ivdd
Like our Facebook page to keep updated with our progress. We also have many products and raffles with all proceeds to our target. https://www.facebook.com/LittleLegsFundraising/
Message us through our Facebook page if you would like to do some fundraising. We have people doing a range of activities to help us achieve our target so anyone who wishes to support is welcome to arrange something of their choosing and will be gratefully welcomed.
Fun show 060817We are also hosting a Dachshund Day in August where there will be a range of stalls, a dog show, children’s entertainment and a pet photographer to name a few! Announcements will be made on our Facebook page in June so pop over and give us a like.
Thanks.
Carley & Lisa

Editor’s note: Thank you, Carley and Lisa, for the £300 you raised in your first week.

More support announced for the UK Dachshund IVDD Screening Programme

May 14, 2017

logoLast year, when we launched our IVDD Screening programme, we applied to the Kennel Club Charitable Trust for a grant to support the programme over the next 3 years. We have been notified that our application has been successful and we are incredibly grateful to the KCCT for their generosity and support for our work.

At the Breed Council meeting held today (14/5/17) it was agreed that, in light of the KCCT grant and other fundraising, the Council would now be able to increase its subsidy of the Screening Programme.

The Council will now be able to offer a £100 subsidy on X-ray screening as well as paying for the scoring of the x-rays.

Depending on the level of uptake of the screening programme, we hope to be able to offer this support for at least 3 years, which should give us a strong base for reducing the risk of IVDD in the breed.

Breeders who have participated in the Screening Programme since its launch will also be able to reclaim £100 from our Health Fund. They are the true pioneers of this programme in the UK and we want to ensure their support is also recognised.

The cost of participating in the Screening Programme, if breeders use our CVS partner vets, will now be just £200. Breeders will still need to pay £300 to the CVS practice carrying out the screening but can reclaim the £100 subsidy from the Breed Council once their screening results have been confirmed.

A condition of participating in the Breed Council’s scheme is that the owner agrees that their dog’s X-ray results may be published in an online registry of screening results and they participate in a regular survey of their dog’s health.

For more information on how to have your dog screened, please visit our IVDD website.

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Dachshund Breed Council AGM 2017

May 14, 2017

The Dachshund Breed Council held its AGM and a Council meeting today (Sunday 14th May 2017).

Ian Seath was re-elected as Chairman to serve for a term of 3 years. He presented his report for 2016 which will be published separately. Anne Moore was re-elected as Vice -chair to serve a further 1-year term.

The Treasurer presented the Council’s accounts and it was agreed, at the Council meeting, that the Midland Dachshund Club would present a proposal for investing in new educational materials to be used at the Discover Dogs and other Pet Show events for Dachshund buyer education.

In light of the continuing importance of investment into breed health improvement projects, it was agreed at the AGM that the Breed Council should set up a charity for the management of future fundraising and expenditure. This will ensure we have effective governance in place and enable us to reclaim Gift Aid on donations. The Health Fund has a current balance of £27,000 with funds ring-fenced for “Give a dog a genome”, IVDD and Lafora projects.

Further investment in the IVDD Screening Programme was also approved by the Council and this will enable us to provide additional subsidies to breeders.

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Dachshund Breed Council Health Improvement Strategy 2017 – video

April 22, 2017

Ian Seath’s presentation at the IPFD International Dog Health Workshop 2017 on the UK Dachshund Breed Council’s Health Improvement Strategy:


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Give a Dachshund a Genome – project update from the AHT

April 14, 2017

We have received this update from the Animal Health Trust on the GDG project which we are participating in. The focus for our breed is Intervertebral Disc Disease (IVDD).

Give a dog a genome 0417

2 new members join our Health Committee Pet Adviser team

February 4, 2017

In 2011, three people, Helga Klausgraber, Emma Newman and Gill Key were invited to join the DBC Health and Welfare sub-committee as Pet Advisers, with a remit that included helping to raise awareness of health and welfare within the pet community by supporting responsible buying and ownership, directing owners to the invaluable resources on the DBC website via social media, the internet and social events. The team also provide input from the pet owner perspective within the sub committee.

Since then, the breed has grown in popularity hugely, in no small part due to the high profile of dachshunds on TV and adverts, and at the same time, the Facebook community has expanded enormously. We now actively participate in the majority of the UK Facebook pet groups along with a number of U.S./multinational groups. Amongst the biggest UK groups are:

· Dachshunds Needing Homes (UK): 8402

· Miniature Dachshund UK : (6342)

· Dachshunds in the United Kingdom (5164)

· Dachshunds Anonymous (UK): ( 5038)

· Simply Sausage Dogs (3830)

· Happy Dachshunds (3445)

· Sausage Dog Walks South Wales UK (3346)

· Dachshunds UK (3285)

There are at least 20 groups with more than 400 members, including regional (e.g. Yorkshire Dachshund Group), variety or colour specific (e.g. Brindle Dachshunds) or with a specific purpose (e.g. Dachshunds for Sale UK – help and advice).

Helga has now emigrated to Australia, where she is doing sterling work on IVDD, and Emma has been increasingly busy with work commitments, meaning that the bulk of the work has been shouldered by Gill Key. For some time, we have been looking for two additional Pet Advisers to support the work, and we are now delighted to announce that two new members have accepted an invitation to join the subcommittee: Charlotte Baldwin and Aimée Thomas. Welcome Charlotte and Aimée, and thank you Helga and Emma for your invaluable contributions.

Charlotte Baldwin:

Although fairly new to the dachshund world, Charlotte has been invited to join due to her incredible organisational and fundraising skills, high social media profile and ongoing commitment to health.

Charlotte and her husband own two mini smooths, Barney and Rosie. A couple of of years ago, keen to socialise them with other dogs, they joined a local dog walking group. It soon became apparent that the excitement and mayhem of running with the big pack of dogs of massively varying sizes may have been putting them in danger.

After a few near misses, in late 2015 they set up a brand-new Facebook group: Sausage dog Walks South Wales UK and invited likeminded dachshund owners along for sociable, safe walks on some of the beautiful beaches in the area. However, it rapidly became so much more, taking all by surprise. Within weeks of announcing a Christmas walk at Porthcawl, over 500 dachshunds descended on Porthcawl for what may be the biggest dachshund walk ever in the UK. Since then the group has continued to grow and now has nearly 3500 members, and even attracted national and international press interest!

Sadly, it soon became apparent that many of the dachshunds were unable to join the walks as they were suffering with IVDD. In September 2016, Charlotte launched Dedicated to Dachshunds, with the aim of providing equipment (temporarily or permanently) and additional therapies for the dachshunds in need, whilst also raising IVDD awareness and the importance of getting an early diagnosis. Charlotte organised fundraising events alongside the walk, mobilising exceptional support from her group and beyond, with people donating their time, goods and donations to the cause.

In just 5 months over £7000 has been raised and D2D now qualifies for charity status. Some money has been passed to Dachshund Rescue and the rest is used to buy and loan out crates, strollers and other equipment as well as supporting complimentary treatment such as hydrotherapy to help wasted muscles and nerve regeneration.

Charlotte is passionate about health and welfare and is very keen to help with ongoing research initiatives and raising awareness of responsible buying and ownership. She is often referred to as the Dachshund Godmother by her Facebook group and hopes to continue to sprinkle this magic and hope across the UK and further, with the generous support and donations from the dachshund pet community.

Charlotte works for the Welsh Blood Service, collecting blood from donors across Wales and all her hobbies all revolve around dachshunds. She wouldn’t want it any other way.

Aimée Thomas

Since meeting a primary school teacher’s black and tan miniature long haired dachshund when she was 7, Aimee has been in love with dachshunds and set herself the goal of one day owning at least one of her own. She now has two miniature long haired dachshunds, a red called Poppy and a shaded cream puppy named Pumpkin, who joined the family at the start of 2017. She also has a 12 year old Black Labrador and a 5 year old Jack Russell terrier. Growing up, she always had the company of animals and her family owned dogs of various breeds including a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, Flat Coated Retriever and Labrador, but none of these breeds never had as big of an effect on her than her dachshunds.

Aimee studied Animal Management and Welfare at Harper Adams University, including units on health, welfare, biology and physiology in the curriculum. Before that she had spent a year helping out on weekends at veterinary practices while at school. Since becoming a dachshund owner, she is now pursuing a career in canine behaviour, with the aim of setting up her own business.

For the last year, she has also one of the two main administrators on the Facebook group ‘Miniature Dachshund UK’, which is now the biggest dachshund group in the UK with over 7000 members, and growing by the day. She regularly responds to requests for information about dachshund health and welfare from other pet owners and has been complimented by members of the Dachshund Breed Council Health and Welfare Sub Committee for her sensible and articulate posts.

Aged 23, she is aware that her experience isn’t as extensive as the other members of the sub-committee, but has already found the information provided by the Dachshund Breed Council invaluable and every day she is learning more and more about this unique breed.

She is incredibly excited to now be part of the team.